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5 Supernatural Events That Defy Explanations Till Today!

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9:00 am 14 Sep, 2018

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The world is a mysterious place and each day something or the other happens that defy our ability to reason immediately. Most of the times, however, such abnormal happenings are explained eventually, but then there are some supernatural events that continue to elude us. The dancing plague of July 1518 at Strasbourg of the Holy Roman Empire was one such supernatural event that still needs a proper explanation. During this absurd occurrence, close to 400 people started dancing suddenly and could not stop until they collapsed. Many died of exhaustion as a result of this over this month-long mania.

This is, however, not the only incident that has kept us baffled. Here are 5 more such supernatural events that defy explanations till today.

 

1. Taxi drivers picking up ‘ghost passengers’ in Japan

 

 

After Japan was hit by an earthquake of magnitude 9 in March 2011, triggering a tsunami that reached more than 130 feet in height in some places, close to 16,000 people was estimated death officially. Months after the catastrophes, the coastal communities of the country started to witness something strange that could not be dismissed easily as anything but supernatural. There were multiple reports of taxi drivers picking up passengers who turned out to be only ghosts.

In one instance, a young woman got into a taxi and told the driver to take her to a place which was totally wrecked by the tsunami. When the driver told her that there was nothing left anymore, she asked the driver if she had died and then quickly vanished. There were just too many people besides the taxi drivers who believed that they saw dead people lining up outside shops that had ceased to exist or roam around the regions.

 

2. Seeing future in dreams

 

 

Precognitive dreams are those dreams that seem to predict the happenings of future and history. There are full of instances where people actually did see the events that eventually happened. One of the most famous examples of such a precognitive dream was what the 16th President of the United States of America Abraham Lincoln had seen and was recorded by his bodyguard.

A few days before being assassinated, Lincoln saw in one of his dreams that he was in White House and there were sounds of weeping coming from somewhere. Lincoln tried to search from where the sounds were coming and landed himself in a room where there was a casket placed and people had gathered for the funeral of somebody. When he asked one of the guards who had died, he was answered that the President of USA had been assassinated.

Though a bit disturbed by it, he but didn’t believe it was an indication of something. He shared the dream with a handful of people including his bodyguard who went on to document this. Few days after that, he was shot dead in a theater.

 

3. The unbelievable case of reincarnation of Shanti Devi

 


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Reincarnation has always been one of the most fascinating and yet debatable ideas. Many religions affirm its occurrence, while many simply deny it. Of the many cases of alleged reincarnations that made it to mainstream media, the case of Shanti Devi was perhaps the most convincing.

Born in the year 1926, Shanti Devi started narrating events from her past life when she was just four years of age. She mentioned that in her previous birth, she was married to one ‘Kedar Nath’ of Mathura. The person not only existed, but when he came in disguise to meet her after hearing her tales, she identified Kedar Nath at once. She told him such details of his life and his wife Lugdi Devi who died after giving birth to their son, that he was convinced Shanti Devi was his deceased wife. But she was disappointed on learning that Kedar Nath hadn’t had kept his promises after her death and never got back to him. She never married and kept giving interviews to national and international media till her death in December 1987.

Even Mahatma Gandhi had set up a commission to investigate her case. The commission concluded that she was indeed the reincarnation of Lugdi Devi.

 

4. The dancing of the sun

 

 

As far as the number of eyewitnesses concerned, the Miracle of the Sun is perhaps the greatest of all the miracles that cannot be dismissed by a scientific explanation or termed as a hoax as close to 1,00,000 people were believed to have witnessed this together.

It all started when three little children near Fatima in Portugal started having visions of the Virgin Mary and it went on for months. When the children requested Mary to do a miracle in front of others so that they could believe in her, she agreed. The children then spread the news and on October 13, 1917, a large number of people gathered at an open place to witness the promised miracle. The gathering also had reporters from many newspapers.

During the noon, there was a rain. When it stopped, the sun was no longer very bright and instead cast coloured lights before dropping down in the horizon and then again zigzagging up to the usual place in the sky. Everyone was dumbfounded at what they had witnessed and the next day issues of the local newspapers reported the same. The Catholic Church strangely took 17 years to investigate the event and recognize this as a miracle. It was officially declared a miracle on October 13, 1930.

 

5. The Devil’s footprints

 

 

On the morning of February 8, 1855, when the residents of Devon, England woke up, they were confronted by trails of mysterious hoof-marks on the snow that stretched between 40 miles to 100 miles. These marks were seen around 30 locations of Devon.

What made these marks strange was that they appeared to be of only one hoof and they were literally over every place. The marks were on frozen rivers, open fields, roofs, walls, inside drain pipes. It was clear that it could not be just a prank. The first-hand evidence of the event but didn’t appear until 1950 when documents of Reverend H. T. Ellacombe, the vicar of Clyst St George in the 1850s was discovered. He had sent those to ‘The Illustrated London News’ marking them ‘not for publication’.

The locals started to refer those marks as Devil’s footprints as they believed that they were made by Satan himself and avoided to venture out at night. Over the years, many theories have popped up to explain the phenomenon. Some suggested it could be a drifting balloon, while others attributed the marks to the mouse, but nothing could quite explain the event convincingly.

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