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Book Reveals That Savings Of Mother Teresa Were So Huge That It Prevented Vatican Bank To Go Bust

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8:07 pm 11 Nov, 2017

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Nun and missionary Mother Teresa, devoted her life in the service of the poor, ailing and the destitute through the Missionaries of Charities, an order of Roman Catholic nuns, in Kolkata. Born in Macedonia to parents of Albanian-descent, she has received numerous awards and recognitions for her endeavours. She received the Padma Shree in 1962 and the Bharat Ratna in 1980. She died in September 1997 and was beatified in October 2003. In December 2015, Pope Francis recognized a second miracle attributed to Mother Teresa, clearing the way for her to be canonized on September 4, 2016.

Biography

Though despite her work, many have criticised her for trying to convert the destitute to Christianity.

Now, an Italian journalist named Gianluigi Nuzzi has revealed in his book ‘The Original Sin’ that Mother Teresa had such huge savings in the Vatican Bank that if she had withdrawn her funds the institution could have defaulted.

Vatican Bank Crux Now

Gianluigi Nuzzi’s newly-released book, ‘The Original Sin,’ digs into the Vatican’s darkest secrets and details how, when American archbishop Paul Marcinkus was appointed president of the Vatican Bank, Mother Teresa was believed to have “by far the most cashed up account.”

When American archbishop Paul Marcinkus was appointed president of the Vatican Bank by Pope Paul VI in 1970, Mother Teresa was believed to have “by far the most cashed-up account,” the book states.

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“If only Mother Teresa had closed the accounts or transferred them, the institute would have risked default,” Nuzzi writes.

Nuzzi went on to say how the discovery of Mother Teresa’s bank account is proof of Marcinkus’ long-standing meddling in Vatican affairs.

“Her [Mother Teresa] account in the Vatican bank is proof that these gentlemen were and still are within the Curia and they trust them. They were also trusted by Mother Teresa, who, as is told, entered the Ior by a secondary door and was welcomed by Monsignor De Bonis, Marcinkus’s right arm,” the book reads.

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