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Remember Islamic State’s Slave Trade Of Yazidi Women? They May Have Shifted Their Operations To Turkey

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5:08 pm 23 Nov, 2017

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One of the most horrendous acts against humanity committed by the Islamic State was the systemic elimination of the Yazidi – a distinct religion – to near extinction. Never since the Holocaust has there been an elimination campaign of such horrific nature anywhere in the world. But in the eyes of the United Nations only the Rohingyas qualify as the “world’s most persecuted minority”. The Islamic State not only killed off many Yazidi men, they enslaved the Yazidi women and kept them as sex slaves. The desert barbarians openly displayed their satanic demonstrations of beheadings, treatment of women, and tortures of captives before the world. They gave the captives only two options: convert or die/get raped.

 

Yazidis fleeing death at the hands of Islamic Stat across the arid lands of Sinjar. Emrah Yorulmaz/Anadolu Ajansı

Today, the Islamic State lies almost destroyed because of a relentless armed struggle of the Kurdish Peshmerga – another persecuted minority – in Iraq with the support of the Iraqi Army and their allies. But up north, in Syria, the Islamic State continues to operate in some way.

How they are managing to hold fort is another story. What is disturbing is that in spite of the fact that they have now become weakened, their barbarism continues in the form of slave market of Yazidi women.

 

Yazidi Children at a refugee camp. UN

The market runs not in war-torn Syria but in the heart of a developed nation – Turkey.

According to the Arabic version of Sputnik and cited by the Clarion Project, Islamic State is running a slave market in Ankara. Yazidi women, who have not been able to escape captivity, are being sold to the highest bidders.

The women are held with families residing in Turkey and loyal to Islamic State. These families, it has been reported, fled Iraq and Syria as the fall of the ISIS neared.

 

Nadia Murad, a Yazidi woman from a small village in northern Iraq who at the age of 19 was abducted by ISIS militants and kept for months as a sex slave before she escaped. YouTube

ISIS also offers to release the Yazidi women for a ransom so exorbitant that the families of the women can’t even pay it, which means that the women go up for auction.

According to the report, the operation is running in three Turkish cities — Gaziantep, Urfa and the capital Ankara.

Yazidi human rights campaigner Ali el-Hansouri told Sputnik that the “ISIS is also not releasing Yazidi children who were transferred to Turkey.”

 

A Yazidi woman weeps as she holds her baby close during their flight from Islamic State barbarians in Sinjar. REUTERS/Rodi Said

The women in captivity were traded around as sex slaves during the height of the ISIS in the region.


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Iraq, according to the report, is doing precious little to save the women or children despite Yazidi organizations reporting about their location.

Turkey and the Islamic State

Turkey shares an 822-km-long border with Syria. Islamic State fighters and their loyalists are believed to have crossed the border  in the guise of migrants. It is obviously very difficult for Turkey to chaff out the genuine migrants from the ISIS barbarians. But in 2016, Jordan’s King Abdullah had accused Turkey of “unleashing terrorists” on European soil as “part of a policy”.

 

A 2015 map showing the border between Turkey and Syria. Bipartisanpolicy

Turkey has also been criticized for its actions during the war against the Islamic State.

Though Turkey has been targeted by Islamic State barbarians, it never launched a sustained military offensive against ISIS, instead attacking only periodically. Till July 2015, a full one year into the coalition offensive, Turkey had attacked ISIS only once.

 

Turkish army tanks make their way toward the Syrian border town of Jarablus, Syria August 24, 2016. Revolutionary Forces of Syria Media Office

At the same time, Turkey launched a major operation against Kurdish fighters in 2016 – the very people fighting the ISIS. (Turkey considers Kurds terrorists.) Even the United States had criticized an April 2017 Turkish airstrike on the Kurdish fighters. Writing for The National Interest, Brad Stapelton had accurately predicted in August 2015 that Turkey would use Obama administration’s request for joining the war against ISIS to target the Kurds.

Its needs to be pointed out that PKK, one of the worst hit Kurdish groups, was the first to come to rescue the Yazidi people from the clutches of the Islamic State in the mountains of Sinjar.

 

But the most severe criticism of Turkey had come in August 2016.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government had accused Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government of supporting terrorist groups, such as Islamic State, Hamas and other Syrian terrorist groups, and the Muslim Brotherhood.

A report by Germany’s Interior Ministry said:

“As a result of the step-by-step Islamization of its foreign and domestic policy since 2011, Turkey has become the central platform for action by Islamist groups in the Middle East.”

The “Islamization” mentioned in the report has been pointed out by international observers, secular journalists in Turkey and some world leaders who allege that Erdogan is quickly transforming the only secular Muslim-majority nation in the Middle East and Europe into an Islamist country. King Abdullah had in March 2016 accused Erdogan of believing in a “radical Islamic solution to the region”.

 

Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Dominik Butzmann für DIE ZEIT

And in 2015 a particularly damning report had emerged alleging that Erdogan’s daughter, Sumeyye Erdogan, was running a secret military hospital for injured ISIS terrorists in a southeastern region in Turkey. The original report was published by Global Research but the report is currently unavailable on their website.

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