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Sri Lankan Players Wore Masks To Counter Delhi’s Pollution, But Twitter Is Calling Them Dramebaaz

8:02 pm 3 Dec, 2017

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India is playing Sri Lanka in a three-match Test series. The hosts are ahead 1-0 with one match drawn. The third Test is being played at Feroz Shah Kotla stadium in New Delhi. Today was the second day of the Test. By the end of the second day India had piled up a massive 536 runs for seven wickets and declared their innings. Sri Lanka ended the day with 131 runs at the loss of 3 wickets.

 

But the match became the talk of the sporting world and everyone in India for a different reason. Now before we go into that, take a look at this photo:

 

That’s the Sri Lankan cricket team wearing masks on the field to protect themselves from air pollution in Delhi which touched another low on Sunday.

There were many interruptions during the course of the match leading to frustration in the Indian dressing room.

Sri Lankan players were clearly not comfortable on the field. The match witnessed the arrival of medical teams on the ground to check the health of the players. Frequent disruptions continued as some Sri Lankan bowlers complained of medical issues.

All of this irritated Virat Kohli who expressed his dissatisfaction over the frequent disruptions. He was soon adjudged LBW when India was on 243.

Delays continued and a frustrated Kohli declared the innings.

This was the first time in the history of cricket that a match was held up due to pollution.

Twitterati was left both amused and enraged. Some of them alleged that the Sri Lankan team was staging this drama to delay things because they are already behind in the series.

 

There were some sarcastic and funny reactions, too!

And there were some who expressed concern or supported the Lankan players’ need for the masks:

Whichever way you see it, the fact remains that pollution is a serious issue in New Delhi. The air quality is indeed very bad for people from nations known for clear weather all through the year such as Australia, New Zealand and Sri Lanka.

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