This Is ‘Varunastra’, Indian Navy’s Indigenously-Built Torpedo That Can Take Out Stealth Subs

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7:50 pm 29 Jun, 2016


Indian Navy got its first indigenously developed anti-submarine torpedo aptly named ‘Varunastra’ on June 29.

The induction of the torpedo put India in a list of eight countries of the world with the capacity to build such a weapon.

 

Manohar Parrikar with the Varunastra. Bhaskar

Manohar Parrikar with the Varunastra. Bhaskar

Named after the mythical weapon of Lord Varuna, ‘Varunastra’ travels at speeds of upto 40 nautical miles under the surface of the water carrying explosives weighing 250 kilos. The total weight of the weapon is 1.25 tonnes.

Developed by the Naval Science and Technological Laboratory of the DRDO, ‘Varunastra’ was first showcased during the Republic Day Parade.

 

Defence officials during the induction of the Varunastra. Bhaskar

Defence officials during the induction of the Varunastra. Bhaskar

At the induction ceremony Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar said that India would look forward to exporting the torpedo.

‘Varunastra’ has been successfully tested in the Bay of Bengal. It was able to hit the targets precisely at great distances under the water. The torpedo has been designed to destroy submarines, including stealth ones, travelling deep beneath the surface of the water.

 


Parrikar during the induction of the Varunastra. Bhaskar

Parrikar during the induction of the Varunastra. Bhaskar

It will be installed on INS Kolkata, INS Delhi and INS Kamorta class of warships besides submarines.

Project Director for Varunastra Torpedo P. Trimurthulu said that the test-firing from a submarine is yet to be done.

“This landmark has put navy in elite club of navies across the globe that can boast of self-reliance in under water sensors and under water weapons,” Navy chief Admiral Sunil Lanba said.

 

The Varunastra is India's first indegenously developed heavyweight torpedo. Bhaskar

The Varunastra is India’s first indegenously developed heavyweight torpedo. Bhaskar

It took almost 10 years to build the torpedo. So Navy Chief Admiral Sunil Lanba stressed on the need to speed up building of such weapons.

“We need to move towards more reasonable time-frames for completing projects,” Admiral Lanba said.

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