This Is Why Bengaluru Will Become India’s First Dead City In 5 Years

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11:50 am 3 May, 2016


The unplanned expansion in real estate is taking its toll on environment and human health in Bengaluru.

 

The impact of urbanisation can be seen at Bangalore's popular MG Road globalurbancommons

The impact of urbanisation can be seen at Bangalore’s popular MG Road globalurbancommons

A study conducted by the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) has raised the alarm bells. The study shows 525% growth in built-up area in Bengaluru in the last four decades, 78% decline in vegetation 79% decline in water bodies.

In an earlier report, Dr T V Ramachandra from IISc and his colleague Dr. Bharath H Aithal studied land use dynamics in Bengaluru, using remote sensing data from Landsat satellites.

125% increase in concretisation in Greater Bengaluru thenewsminute

125% increase in concretisation in Greater Bengaluru thenewsminute

The study showed that through exponential and unbridled growth “Bengaluru is gradually becoming an unliveable city and will be dead in five years.”

Bengaluru’s land growth or concretisation has increased by 925 percent since 1970. And this essentially means the city is just getting worse by the day.

These two charts in this series show the changes in landscape of the Agara-Bellandur wetlands from 2000-2015.

 


The satellite imagery showed that in 2014, Bengaluru, which currently has a population of over 95 lakh, had just 14,78,500 trees.

Talking about how pathetic the situation is, Ramachandra said:

“For every seven persons there is one tree. Based on age, every day one person exhales 540-900 grams of carbon dioxide and one hectare of trees takes in close to 8 ton of carbon dioxide. So based on that calculation every person needs 8 trees. So you can imagine how pathetic the situation is.”

Bengaluru was the most sought-after among big cities given its pleasant climate and the easy availability of land, a decent economy and low-key politics.

Toxic chemicals foam leaked from the lake to the streets in Bangalore gorgeousplace

Toxic chemicals foam leaked from the lake to the streets in Bangalore gorgeousplace

 

Prof Ramachandra said the government must take necessary steps to decongest Bengaluru. Besides banning new industries in the city, the government should make sure other districts get these economic benefits.

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