Top 10 doomsday predictions that failed

Say it a business strategy or an attempt to increase the toll of fanatic followers, but the prophecies about the doomsday have always baffled people across the world. Well, there is nothing to worry about hatched hoaxes made by some pseudo-Gods. Live your life to extent, enjoy your day, read this post and wait for the upcoming prophecy of 2012.

10. The Late, Great Planet Earth:

Written by Hal Lindsey and Carole C. Carlson, this book describes the second coming of Christ on planet earth which would eradicate the presence of living being. This book claims the arrival of Christ after one generation from the foundation of modern Israel. According to Bible, one generation is equivalent to 40 years. Considering this theory, the world would have been finished in 1988, as modern Israel was founded in 1948.

9. The Jupiter Effect:

Published in 1974, The Jupiter Effect is a best-selling book, written by John Gribbin and Stephen Plagemann. This book predicted that on March 10, 1982, an alignment of the planets of the solar system would result in a hellacious catastrophe, ending the existence of earth.

8. Judgement Day of May 21, 2011:

Harold Camping, an American Christian radio host, predicted that on May 21, 2011, the universe would be destroyed by God. Following the failure of his prognostication, he was globally ridiculed by the mainstream media. Not even this, on May 23, Camping, once again forecasted the occurrence of Doomsday on October 21, 2011.

7. Halley’s Comet, 1910:

According to Camille Flammarion, a notable French astronomer, the planet earth would pass through the tail of Comet Halley, in April 1910. He told that the tail of Comet majorly comprised a toxic gas “cyanogen.” He predicted that the lethal gas would wipe out all life on the planet, during earth’s passage through the tail. However, his prediction failed but till then terrified people were all set to face this catastrophe by anti-comet umbrellas and anti-comet pills.

6. Nostradamus, 1999:

A reputed French seer better known for his collections of prophecies, Michel de Nostradamus predicted that in July 1999, King of Terror will descend from sky to devastate human beings from earth. Since Nostradamus was famous for his authentic predictive powers, this prophecy terrorized people with anticipated mayhem.

5. Y2K Prophecy:

Better known as the Millennium Bug, Y2K problem deals with the abbreviation of a four-digit year to two digits. It predicted that from the starting of January 1, 2000, day-to-day operations will become more complex due to computing errors. Air crashes, explosions in nuclear reactors, failure of life saving equipments in hospitals and many other causes will gradually wipe out human beings from earth.

4. Heaven’s Gate, 1997:

Heaven’s Gate was a group of cults, founded by Marshall Applewhite and Bonnie Nettles. Marshall believed that the earth was about to be recycled, and in order to survive he must have to leave the planet immediately. According to the creed of this group, human body was merely a “vehicle,” meant to help them to reach “next level.” On March 19-20, 1997, Applewhite, along with other 38 members of his group committed suicide, with a belief that their soul would reach to the next level of existence.

3. Pat Robertson:

An illustrious media mogul and American business tycoon, Pat Robertson is well known for being an ex-Baptist minister aligned with the Christian Right. In end of 1976, he stated that God talked to him and informed about the Doomsday that is going to come between October or November of 1982. Since he is an influential figure, his voice is always supported by the fanatic followers.

2. Mormon Armageddon:

Joseph Smith, Jr. was an eminent American religious leader and founder of notable Mormon church. In February 1835, he called a meeting of his church leaders and informed them about his conversation with God, according to which Jesus was expected to return on earth within 56 years. After Jesus’ arrival, the end time of planet earth would begin responsively.

1. The Millerites:

William Miller, an American Baptist preacher of mid-nineteenth century, predicted that the world would end between March 21, 1843 and March 21, 1844. Later, his followers (known as The Millerites) concluded the actual date as April 23, 1843. Thousands of Miller’s followers denounced their money and other commodities, assuming them futile.

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