Ratan Tata Expresses Concern Over Alleged Intolerance In The Country, Calls It A Curse

11:39 am 23 Oct, 2016


Rekindling the intolerance debate, chairman emeritus of Tata Sons, Ratan Tata, has expressed concern over the alleged growing intolerance in the country.

Chairman emeritus of Tata Sons, Ratan Tata, rednewswire

Chairman emeritus of Tata Sons, Ratan Tata, rednewswire

“I think everybody knows where the intolerance is coming from, what it is. Like many thousands, millions of Indians, one wants to see a country without intolerance,” Tata said on October 22.

Endorsing Congress leader Jyotiraditya Scindia’s views on the issue, he spoke against the alleged growing intolerance in his address at the 119th foundation day function of Scindia School.

financialexpress

financialexpress

The eminent industrialist said in his address said the intolerance is a curse that we are seeing of late.

“We want to live in an environment where we love our fellow men. We don’t shoot them, we don’t kill them. We don’t hold them hostages but give a bit of ourselves and we give and take,” Tata added.

Before Tata, Scindia in his address to the students said, “The hallmark of a civilised society is debate, discussion and disagreement. An environment of intolerance was prevailing in the country today.”

huffingtonpost

huffingtonpost

“An environment in which each one of us is told what to speak, what to hear, how to dress, what to eat,” Scindia said.

A crackdown on dissent was against the progress of society, the Congress leader said, while hitting out at cow vigilantes.

Last year, Mohammad Akhlaq, 50, was dragged from his house in Bisada village near Dadri town in Greater Noida, and beaten to death by around 100 people over rumours he had eaten beef. Akhlaq’s murder fuelled concerns that religious intolerance may be growing under the Modi government.  The event unleashed a chain of protests across the country, with prominent writers, filmmakers and scientists returning their state awards.

theweek

theweek

Critics have accused the Centre of having failed to protect minorities since it came to power at 2014 general elections. While PM Modi did eventually describe the lynching as “unfortunate”, many commentators pointed out that it took the prime minister several weeks to respond.

 

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