Pakistan Arrests Nat Geo’s Green-Eyed ‘Afghan Girl’ In Peshawar

4:15 pm 26 Oct, 2016


Pakistan’s Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) has arrested Nat Geo’s famed famous green-eyed ‘Afghan girl’ from her home in Peshawar for possessing a fake Pakistani Computerised National Identity Card (CNIC).

Bibi has dual Pakistani and Afghan nationality, and both ID cards have been recovered from her, Dawn online reported.

afg-FB

Until last year, Pakistani officials were investigating Bibi.

Reports suggest that she had applied for a Pakistani identity card in Peshawar in April 2014, using the name Sharbat Bibi. She was one of thousands of Afghan refugees who managed to dodge Pakistan‘s computerised system and to get an identity card.

In 1985, photographer Steve McCurry took the image of the then 12-year-old Sharbat Gula at the Nasir Bagh refugee camp, situated on the edge of Peshawar, and thereafter she became the most famous cover image in the National Geographic magazine’s history.

nationalgeographic

nationalgeographic

 

The photo has been likened with Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. National Geographic has also made a short documentary about her life and dubbed her the ‘Mona Lisa of Afghan war’.

FIA has launched a crackdown against those who have obtained fake ID cards fraudulently and launched a reverification campaign across Pakistan.

As per FIA, the officer who had issued the ID cards to Sharbat Bibi got bail-before-arrest to avoid arrest in the case.

Last year, National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) issued three CNICs to Sharbat Bibi and two men who claimed to be her sons. Issuance of CNICs were in violation to the rules and procedures of NADRA.

She now faces seven to 14 years prison time and fine between $3,000 to $5,000 if convicted by court over fraud.

Photographer Steve McCurry  metro

Photographer Steve McCurry metro

Officials say NADRA has so far reverified 91 million ID cards and detected 60,675 cards by non nationals fraudulently.

More than 350,000 Afghan refugees have returned to their war-torn homeland from Pakistan this year, UN data shows, with the torrent of people crossing the border expected to continue.

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