Nagrota Attack A Revenge For Afzal Guru’s Hanging, Papers Found With Terrorists Reveal

9:44 am 1 Dec, 2016


Investigating officers looking into Nagrota terror attack on Army camp have exposed the links of three slain terrorists with Pakistan-based terror outfit Jaish-e-Muhammad’s Al-Shohada Brigade, or Shaheed Afzal Guru Squad, formed in 2013.

Among the things recovered from them were energy drinks, urdu notes, dry-fruit packets, AK-47s and grenades. The militants were carrying a stockpile of grenades with them.

wion

Things recovered from slain terrorists wion

Officials have found a note written in Urdu saying that the attack was to avenge the hanging of 2001 Parliament attack accused Afzal Guru.

The note said: “Shaheed Afzal Guru ka intekaam ki ek aur kist (one more instalment of the revenge of Afzal Guru’s martyrdom)” and Gazwai Hind ke fidayeen (Conquer-India suicide squad).

Afzal Guru thejapantimes

Afzal Guru thejapantimes

The squad is suspected to have carried out the Pathankot terror attack as well. It has left behind a similar note in the car used to access the airbase.

Six attackers who targeted the Nagrota Army camp crossed over from Pakistan the night before the attack. The terrorists travelled 85 km undetected and managed to avoid two Army check points before they reached Nagrota. After arriving there, they headed straight to officers mess and sprayed bullets and lobbed grenades.

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Nagrota is barely 40 km from the international border, which is manned by the BSF.

Security agencies are worried of this increasing trend of attacking military installations despite them maintaining strict border vigil in the wake of the surgical strikes. They are also worried the ease with which these terrorists could breach the perimeter of the establishment.

Intelligence agencies believe there were 200-300 terrorists close to the launching pads near the IB/LoC at any given time since the surgical strikes, waiting for an opportunity to cross over.

amarujala

amarujala

Officials believe given the current level of hostilities with Pakistan, infiltration, which is double of levels seen last year, will remain high in the winter as well.

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