17 Reasons Why We Indians Really Need to Get Over The Manglik Dosh

What’s with the Manglik Dosh and why are even the most educated Indians paranoid about it? You may be living in a small village or one of the metropolitans, but when it comes to marriage, your parents won’t let you tie the knot with a Manglik.

And even if you manage to get their stamp of approval, they will (probably) first get the Manglik girl married to a banana tree or a peepal tree. How silly!

As educated Indians, it is time we shed our illusions.

1. There is no evidence to back the claim that the marriage between a Manglik and non-Manglik will spell doom.

Any studies? Any numbers and figures to prove the outcomes?

No there aren’t any. And still, millions of Indians are still so paranoid about it.

All that you need is LOVE and guts to make it work. That’s all.


2. Shed superstitions; it is time we practice our education.

Educated people go by logic and shouldn’t take some of life’s most important decisions purely on the basis of blind faith.

This Manglik thing, at the most, can only be about a set of personality characteristics. But each one of us is unique, is that not so?


3. Marriages quite often fail even after horoscope matching and rituals and all-sorts-of astrological precautions.

These people weren’t even Mangliks, so what happened to them?


4. It is said that Mars by nature is aggressive, impatient, independent, and strongly goal driven – what is wrong with that?

Being aggressive, impatient, independent, and goal-driven does not make a person a lethal marriage material.


5. May be there’s another set of characteristics so-called Mangliks have that others easily lose sight of.

No marks for being polite, courageous, strong, sharp, focused, or disciplined? Is that not what people want in their potential life-partners?


6. If astrology is really some sort of Science, Mangliks should have relevance in every religion & society.

But it is not the case.


7. Accepting Manglik Dosh shows how unstable & emotionally disturbed we are as a society.

Only people with fickle minds can allow superstitions to take control over them.


8. By all means, believe in holy things; but if this belief results in heartbreak for someone & a complete loss of trust – is it still worth?

Manglik Dosh is not holy and believers who have faith in this stupid superstition are but shit scared fools.


9. The premises of belief and faith need to be questioned at every step in our logical existence.

And if we examine the concept of Manglik, it should either be abolished or at least revised.


10. It is against humanity to declare or label people as being cursed; and for the Hindus, Manglik is synonymous with ‘being cursed’.

Sounds weird but it’s happening right here in this very country we all live in.


11. Seriously you’d get a Manglik married to banana tree before getting them married to a person?

How about these people check their convictions! Maybe it is also the time we questioned the very concept of marriage, no?


12. Manglik individuals, the same science of astrology says, have energy that can be compared to fire; how about putting it to some productive use and not extinguish by dogmas.


13. Marriages are based on individual compatibility, not on the labels they acquire through astrology.


14. Troubled Professional life? Doesn’t everyone suffer from the syndrome? What’s it got to do with being Manglik?

Are all professionally unsuccessful people Mangliks?


15. May be the real reason why Manglik girls are not accepted in Hindu society is because they emerge to be too strong and dominating.

But Hindu girls are required to be docile and obedient in order to be compatible with an Indian husband. How convenient!


16. It brings along a painful pursuit for astrologers and Pandits, and leads to a vicious circle of rituals and rundown of faith.

This is the reason why a Manglik girl is given in marriage to a tree before she can marry a human. WTF.


17. Even the Ramayana, Mahabharata and Puranas don’t mention it anywhere.

All they mention is to decide for an auspicious mahurat for the wedding.



Facebook Discussions