This ‘Bird-Shaped’ Surveillance Drone Proves That Spying Is Taking A Dangerous Avatar

The use of drones for surveillance and war is not uncommon. The United States has been extensively using some of the world’s deadliest drone with such ferocious effectiveness that the day is not far they will replace fighter jets.

And as more and more countries employ drones in service, the drones themselves are becoming stealthier and deadlier.

This is the picture of a drone that crashed (some reports say it was downed) in the Somalian capital of Mogadishu.


Somalia is strife-torn country and a haven for modern-day sea pirates.

Modelled like a bird, the drone can easily be mistaken for one in the sky. According to reports, the drone could have been used to spy on targets by Somali intelligence agency, National Intelligence and Security Agency (NISA).

The unmanned aerial vehicle, which crashed on July 11, has two propellers attached to the wings, which look like a bird’s feathered wing. Even the angles of the wing are shaped like a bird’s.


The shape is not all. Reports say that the wings can flap.

A flappable-wing drone is in the arsenal of the US Army Special Operations Command. It can be fired from a specially designed launcher or simply deployed by hand.


This Somalian bird-shaped drone shows how fast the drone technology is becoming modified for not just a perfected, bird-like flying but to also make sure that the drones remain undetectable.

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