6 Reasons Why Emails Can Never Beat Hand-Written Letters

Distance can bring us closer. What fun is there in getting something reached in no time to someone who’s far, far away from you? It might be convenient, but it’s not romantic. There is a very special feeling attached to hand-written letters that split-second emails can ever possess. It might be the same old versus new thing but we really feel special to get letters written by someone instead of clicking to open a digitized version. Here are few reasons why emails can never come close to the grandeur of hand-written letters:

6. Tangibility Counts a Great Deal

Holding something in our hands gives us the feeling of really owning it, doesn’t it? Reading a mail on the screen is a rather official and unromantic thing to do. To actually hold it in your palms and feel the texture of the paper is a completely different thing, way different from everything. And doesn’t it generate real mystery on what the letter holds? We wait to open it and rush through the content. It’s a wonderful experience. The tangible factor of letters is something which will always keep them above emails.

Tangibility Counts a Great Deal

5. Your Own Handwriting can be very Effective

Your handwriting is yours and only yours. Nobody can copy it and nobody can make you write it. An email send by you might be typed by someone else and vice versa. But, once you see the person’s handwriting, you immediately understand who it is. It makes one feel special and really important. To see the handwriting of your loved ones after a long time can be the most satisfying thing ever.

Your Own Handwriting can be very Effective

4. The Time Factor

An email reaches the recipient in no time. You may even get a reply within another instance. A letter on the other hand will take quite a bit of time to reach. It has to go through the post office procedures which take at least a day or two inside India, and more if you’re abroad. However, the anticipation and wait for the letter simply ignores the time taken. We are more bothered about the letter than the time taken for its arrival. After all, a worthwhile thing requires time for its completion.

The Time Factor

3. It Stays with You Forever

Which one has been more satisfying? Finding the yellow pages of a letter send to you way back by your father who lives abroad or an email send few years back by him? Yes, it’s the former. The email is special, yes, but the letter retains its value much after it has been read and by-hearted by you. Glancing at it for the nth time wouldn’t make you dependent on your server. You can even keep it to show your grand children, your precious possessions! Okay that’s pretty late, but on any account, they are going to live with you till the end. And if the next generation values them, then it could stay forever.

It Stays with You Forever

2. A Hand-Written Letter Demands Devotion

You do take a lot of care in writing your letter than typing an email, don’t you? It’s but natural to be extra careful, thoughtful and excited to write a letter. Typing an email is like a clerical job, as ordinary as that – and is a matter of a few seconds. In case of letters, you spend a lot of time in thinking about what to write and how to write and many more. The devotion taken in writing a letter pays off when it becomes the most important thing to the recipient. You’ll actually understand its value when you’ll start writing them.

A Hand-Written Letter Demands Devotion

1. A Letter Maketh a Man

It is what you say, and eventually, what you write that shows who you are. Your letters are going to represent what you stand for to the recipient in later years. Looking at a letter sent by a friend immediately makes us recall him/her. It defines the person he/she is. And it is only through writing a letter that you can express yourself best to another person. An email stands no chance here. Much, much later, when you’ll be recalled by your closest people, it’s going to be through photographs, memory and your letters. The most enduring part? They even have your handwriting.

A Letter Maketh a Man

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